Tag Archives: dairy

Something Stupid!

I have to admit I did something quite stupid recently, and I paid for it. Mind you, I would never knowingly touch a crumb of gluten. Yes, it’s that nasty for probably about 30% of the population according to some experts. Whether you have celiac disease or are gluten intolerant you should never consume this troublesome protein.

We were out for a bite of dinner and I ordered a gluten-free vegetarian pizza. When it arrived I realized I’d forgotten to ask for no dairy. The waitress was happy to get me another pizza without cheese, but I said, against my better judgement, not to bother. I managed to foolishly consume most of it.

At the gym the next morning I would say I was about 20% off my usual self. I could feel my lower back around my spine, my leg muscles talked to me, my energy wasn’t quite there, and my balance and rhythm were a bit off. I was also a bit stuffy. You might think this isn’t so bad, but with repeated indulgence of foods our body recognizes as “the bad guy” along with the # 1 “bad boy, gluten” that many of you are in sheer denial about, the inflammation that is generated may be wearing away at numerous levels of your health.

If I had intestinal ramifications from dairy I never would have let this slip. But I never should have anyway because the immune system recognizes dairy as a foreign invader, in my case, and creates antibodies to fight these antigens off. Dairy can act just like gluten in destroying the villi. (1)

Gluten can affect any part of your body in a degenerative manner, and dairy seems to be affecting about 50% of those on a GF diet that I talk to.

Do you have aches and pains, fatigue, general ill health, brain fog, skin or gastro issues? Download the Free Report on the Home page upper right corner for a list of 50 symptoms and disorders linked to gluten at http://toxicstaple.com. Gluten and dairy may be at the root of what’s ailing you or someone you love. Dig your head out of the sand before your health spirals down any further.

There is no end to the research on a lengthy list of over 300 symptoms and diseases linked to gluten. It appears through copious reading since 2004 that there’s not much illness that’s not linked to gluten and often dairy, as many of my storytellers report. Add in heavy metals, dirty water and air, chemicals and plastics, and you have a toxic soup of degenerative disease and numerous ailments. At least clean up the toxins in your environment you can control before they control you!

Become your own advocate to rise above your ailments and live a longer, stronger, healthier life. Do it now before your health issues become much worse. You can do this!

  1. Watt, J., J. R. Pincott, and J. T. Harries. “Combined Cow’s Milk Protein and Gluten-induced Enteropathy: Common or Rare?” Gut 24 (1983): 165–70.

 

 

Parkinson’s Disease and The Gut

Recent research on Parkinson’s Disease (PD) and the gut biome suggests researchers may have been barking up the wrong tree. PD appears to be associated with dysbiosis or the ill health of your gut microbiome, not just the brain as was once thought.

PD has a “strong environmental component.”(1) Does this mean that what we breathe, drink, and eat can seriously affect our health depending on what genes we have? That’s the new line of thinking called epigenetics.

The article mentions exposure to pesticides, but does not mention a word about gluten, and of course there are numerous other toxins in our environment.

Gluten can be the root cause to over 300 symptoms and disorders/diseases that are well substantiated by over 19,000 world studies. Among them are anxiety, mood disorders, depression, headaches/migraines, schizophrenia, autism, ADHD, tics, muscular issues, and many more neurological issues that can be linked to celiac disease, a malabsorption issue. Many of these neuro-disorders can disappear or get miles better once the trigger, gluten, and perhaps dairy and other proteins are detected and removed from the diet and the gut has a chance to heal.

It’s interesting to note that PD patients may also have constipation (a common symptom of celiac) and other gut symptoms years before the PD symptoms first appear.

Although “they” say there is “no cure” and no “preventative” measures perhaps researchers have not looked hard enough at gluten intolerance and celiac disease and thorough enough testing to detect intolerance.

It would be intriguing to know how many newly diagnosed PD, ALS, or Alzheimer’s patients tested positive for gluten intolerance/celiac disease if given the extent of testing presented in my book, Toxic Staple. Too many patients are only given one test; it’s not enough in most cases.

To discover more research on PD and neurological issues related to gluten read Chapter 9: Neurological Dilemmas: The Mind-blowing Hazards of Gluten (the longest chapter in the book).

Order your copy of Toxic Staple here: https://www.amazon.com/Toxic-Staple-Gluten-Wrecking-Health/dp/0989239217 or http://www.toxicstaple.com

(1)Timothy R. Sampson et al. Gut Microbiota Regulate Motor Deficits and Neuroinflammation in a Model of Parkinson’s Disease. Cell, December 2016 DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.11.018 http://www.cell.com/cell/abstract/S0092-8674(16)31590-2

Cell Press. “Gut microbes promote motor deficits in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 December 2016. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/12/161201122159.htm .

 

 

 

 

 

Scenario 3: Weight Gain, ADHD, Brain Fog, Mucus, Lungs, Atrial Fib, Cardiomyopathy, and Skin Issues

It amazes me how prevalent gluten issues seem to be. On my way to Denver, once again, I jotted some notes. Mind you, I did not request to be seated next to people who had health issues that very well could be or are linked to gluten. In only one example below did the person know she was intolerant to gluten or had celiac disease; the others had no idea the ailments mentioned could be from gluten and perhaps dairy. Certainly there is enough research in my book discussing such connections to gluten, not to mention stories of lives turning around by going GF, that anyone with these symptoms or ailments might want to take testing seriously. It seems life only gets worse if gluten related issues are ignored.

As usual I always suggest requesting the 4 blood tests you will find spelled out in Chapter 16 and if negative on those or if they are not covered by insurance don’t stop until you read Chapter 17 and do the very sensitive stool tests (not your ordinary lab/hospital tests, but a patented specific test that will likely detect intolerance if it exists). Try to find a doctor who is familiar with gluten issues, and bring your list of tests or you probably won’t get enough to discover celiac or intolerance to gluten.

  • On the first leg to Denver I chatted with a woman who had weight issues. I relayed to her that many folks I’ve spoken with dropped 10-40 lbs. without trying by following a gluten-free lifestyle. The weight just sort of peeled off in nearly every case. I lost 10-15 myself without trying. There is scant research backing this up (because little has been done), but there is one study basically saying those people who are so thin due to celiac weight-loss begin to put weight on when the gut heals and those who are overweight begin to lose it.* Also, her grandson who was very smart was also very hyper. I mentioned a couple stories on ADD/ADHD and heavily suggested the parents get the child tested. But it’s the same old story: you need to know what to ask for or you probably won’t get enough testing and may be told you don’t have a problem with gluten when in fact you may be quite gluten intolerant.
  • On the second leg to Denver I sat next to a woman who ate no grains. If she gets hit with a grain her head becomes foggy, ears plug up, she fills up with mucus and her lungs feel heavy. It takes 1-2 weeks for symptoms to lift.
  • On the first leg back to NE I sat with a woman whose son died of cardio issues while running a race. Research exists in Toxic Staple on one form of atrial fib and cardiomyopathy that will resolve with a GF diet.** You will also find a few studies on heart disease. Of course, so much more research needs to done. It wouldn’t be difficult to take a hundred newly diagnosed patients with atrial fib or cardiomyopathy and ask them if they were offered testing for gluten-related issues. My educated guess would be less than 5%…and that’s being generous. Testing for gluten-related illness should be at the top of the list in my estimation; there is just too much bad health linked to gluten and so little is being done to educate our doctors.
  • On the leg back to New England I sat next to a young woman who was dealing with facial skin problems. So many skin problems can be linked to gluten and/or dairy as discussed in Chapter 11: The Skin You’re In. I mention nearly 20 skin disorders that you never heard of before, and it’s very likely barely 5% (that’s being generous again) of skin specialists have heard of their link to gluten. Skin issues can be a sign of unwellness, and many of them will clear up or get miles better once your gut heals with a GF lifestyle.

The purpose of these scenarios is to make the reader aware of some of the numerous and varied symptoms and maladies linked to gluten so they can become empowered to be their own advocate in conjunction with their doctors in seeking better health. Your best health lies in your very own hands.

* A new study concluded that a GFD “had a beneficial impact on BMI [body mass index]; underweight patients gained weight (66%) and overweight/obese patients (54%/47%) lost weight. The improvement in BMI adds to the impetus to diagnose celiac disease.” [from Toxic Staple page 71.)

  • Cheng, J., P. S. Brar, A. R. Lee, and P. H. Green. “Body Mass Index in Celiac Disease: Beneficial Effect of a Gluten-free Diet.” Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology 44, no. 4 (2010): 267–71.

** “In addition to patients with chronic anemia of unclear origin, those with rhythm disturbances and myocardiopathies of unknown etiology should be tested for antiendomysial and antigiladin antibodies because, if positive, could indicate the presence of celiac disease.”

  • Callejas Rubio, J. L., N. Ortego, A. Diez-Ruiz, J. Guilarte, and J. De la Higuera-Iorres. “Celiac Disease Presenting as Chronic Anemia Associated with Heart Block.” American Journal of Gastroenterology 93 (1998): 1391–92.